Make sure you have:
Grading Rubric.....possibe
points
copy 3-6 graphics and 2 pages of understandable information. from the internet.
Put copied information on the bottom and your own writing with pictures on the top.
Label the copied information "Copied from the internet" Site the website where you got it.
Study the material you copied and prepare yourself to summarize what you found out.
Type 3 paragraphs in your own words using only words you understand...do not cut and paste!

*need 3 paragraphs developed

need copied info from internet labeled
pictures good but could use labels
copy and paste info ..10
organization ..............5
3 paragraphs............10

Total points..............25
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The chaparral biome is found in a little bit of most of the continents - the west coast of the United States, the west coast of South America, the Cape Town area of South Africa, the western tip of Australia and the coastal areas of the Mediterranean.
Lay of the land: The chaparral biome has many different types of terrain. Some examples are flat plains, rocky hills and mountain slopes. It is sometimes used in movies for the "Wild West".
Chaparral is characterized as being very hot and dry. As for the temperature, the winter is very mild and is usually about 10 °C. Then there is the summer. It is so hot and dry at 40 °C that fires and droughts are very common.
Fortunately, the plants and animals are adapted to these conditions. Most of the plants have small, hard leaves which hold moisture. Some of these plants are poison oak, scrub oak, Yucca Wiple and other shrubs, trees and cacti.
The animals are all mainly grassland and desert types adapted to hot, dry weather. A few examples: coyotes, jack rabbits, mule deer, alligator lizards, horned toads, praying mantis, honey bee and ladybugs.
So, if you ever go somewhere that is like chaparral, make sure to bring some sunscreen and lots of water!
by Lucy M. 2000

In its natural regime, chaparral is characterized by infrequent fires, with intervals ranging between 10–15 years to over a hundred years. Mature chaparral (stands that have been allowed greater intervals between fires) is characterized by nearly impenetrable, dense thickets (except the more open chaparral of the desert). These plants are highly flammable. They grow as woody shrubs with hard and small leaves; are non-leaf dropping (non-deciduous); and are drought tolerant. After the first rains following a fire, the landscape is dominated by soft-leaved non-woody annual plants, known as fire followers, which die back with the summer dry period.

Similar plant communities are found in the four other Mediterranean climate regions around the world, including the Mediterranean Basin (where it is known as maquis), central Chile (where it is called matorral), South African Cape Region (known there as fynbos), and in Western and Southern Australia (as kwongan). According to the California Academy of Sciences, Mediterranean shrubland contains more than 20% of the world's plant diversity.[1] The word chaparral is a loan word from Spanish chaparro, meaning both "small" and "dwarf" evergreen oak, which itself comes from the Basque word txapar, with exactly the same meaning.

Conservation International and other conservation organizations consider the chaparral to be a biodiversity hotspot[2]- a biological community with a large number of different species - that are under threat by human activity.